Curriculum Vitae

Education

Professional Development

Fall 2013, University of Virginia, completed gifted education course: Developing & Implementing Curriculum for the Gifted (EDIS5046)

Fall 2012, University of Virginia, completed gifted education course: Introduction to Models and Strategies for Teaching the Gifted (EDIS5047)

Fall 2012, Awarded Virginia State Teaching License

Fall 2011, University of Virginia, completed gifted education course: Introductory Strategies for Gifted Education (EDIS5045)

Summer 2011, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, completed four education courses: Classroom Behavior Management (EDIC5774), Curriculum & Instructional Procedures (EDIC5774), Composition & Content Reading (EDIC5264), Foundations of Education (EDIC5774)

Summer 2010, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, competed one education course: Human Growth & Development (EDIC5774)

Academic Background

Summer 2009, Completed studies at University of Missouri-St. Louis (UMSL), 3.4 GPA

Summer 2007, Awarded Masters in Physics after successfully defending “Carbon Monoxide in Disks Around Young Stellar Objects

Fall 2005, Began classes at University of Missouri-St. Louis working towards M.S. degree in Physics

Spring 2005, Graduated from Radford University. Awarded Bachelor of Science in Physical Science with concentrations in both Physics and Earth & Space Science, Minor in Mathematics, 3.45GPA

Winter 2005, Accepted to University of Missouri-St. Louis graduate program in Physics. Awarded a teaching assistantship

Fall 2001, Began classes at Radford University working towards B.S. degree in Physical Science with concentrations in both Physics and Earth & Space Science

June 2001, Graduated from Northwest High School

June 2001, Northwest High School Pathfinder Award recipient. First student to earn this honor. Was awarded in recognition of being “The one to discover the way” 

January 2001, Accepted to Radford University undergraduate program. P. Buckley Moss Scholar

Radford University

The physical science degree had two concentrations that I completed. The Earth & Space concentration required a diverse set of classes in physics and geology, while the Physics concentration required primarily physics classes. As part of my undergraduate experience, I also completed summer internships at both NASA and NOAA. In the Geophysics course, I was instructed on how to conduct surveys and process data from various pieces of geophysics equipment including gravimeters, resistivity arrays, magnetometers, EM-31, seismic arrays, and thermal sensors. The meteorology course was focused on understanding of meteorological processes, along with processing of realtime remote sensing satellite data from NOAA POES satellites. A holistic view of the Earth’s climate system was an integral part of the class. As part of my undergraduate experience, I was a member of a research group that joined a larger NASA group traveling to the North Pole to conduct a sea ice survey. An attempt was made to measure sea ice thickness by correlating EM-31 data and ice drill data collected by another research team on the trip.

Science Courses Completed: General Physics I/II (PHYS111/112), Meteorology (PHYS301), Optics (PHYS310), Mechanics (PHYS320), Thermo-Statistical Mechanics (PHYS330), Geophysics (PHYS406), Modern Physics (PHYS410), Electricity & Magnetism I (PHYS421), Energy and the Environment (PHSC431), Independent Study (Arctic Research; PHYS498), Independent Study (Amateur Radio ; PHYS498), Independent Study (Meteorology; PHSC498), Exploring Earth (GEOL101), Environmental Geology (GEOL103), Oceanography (GEOL365), General Astronomy I/II (ASTR111/112), Galactic Astronomy & Cosmology (ASTR422), Calculus and Analytical Geometry I/II (MATH151/152), Calculus and Analytical Geometry III/IV (MATH251/252), Applied Linear Algebra w/ Matrices (MATH260), Statistics for Science (STAT208), Principles of Computer Science I (CPSC120), Principles of Biology (BIOL101)

University of Missouri-St. Louis

Research (PHYS6490) 19 credits

As part of my graduate work, I completed research with the astrophysics group. This research included the successful defense of my masters thesis, “Carbon Monoxide in Disks Around Young Stellar Objects”. The research I conducted focused on the Rho Ophiuchus and Taurus star forming regions. Data were taken by the W. M. Keck II NIRSPEC instrument and were processed. IDL programs were used to search for organic molecules in the disks around T Tauri young stellar objects. The primary focus was to find a correlation between column densities of carbon monoxide and inclination angle of the disk. I also completed major updates to the IDL code, and collaborated to update the atmospheric calibration model. The research also included travel to Hawaii to collect data using the NASA IRTF CSHELL instrument. Data were collected on three NSF funded trips. A poster entitled “Organic Molecules in Protoplanetary Disks” was presented at the 212th annual American Astronomical Society (AAS) Conference.

Courses Completed: Intro to Quantum Mechanics (PHYS4331), Observational Astronomy (ASTR4322), Relativity and Cosmology (PHYS4370), Intro to Mathematical physics (PHYS5402), Nonlinear Dynamics and Stochastic Problems (PHYS5345), Special Problems (PHYS6400), Theatrical Mechanics I (PHYS6409), Statistical Mechanics (PHYS6413), Quantum Mechanics I (PHYS6461), Quantum Mechanics II (PHYS6463), Electrodynamics (PHYS6411), Electrodynamics II (PHYS6423), Seminar (PHYS6410)

Professional Work Experience

Southwest Virginia Governor’s School, Physics Instructor

As a Governor’s School teacher, I taught at or above the level found in colleges and universities across the country. The Southwest Virginia Governor’s School serves gifted students by offering motivated learners the opportunity to take college science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) courses while they are still in high school. Only top students from 15 different area high schools in 8 different school districts are eligible to attend and gain unique insight into scientific research.

Part of the students education is focused on learning research methodology. This took two paths for me: mentoring independent science projects and engaging students in field research. While at the school, I mentored over 130 students in science projects that covered many disciplines. Students were required to compete in local, regional, state, and international science fairs and competitions. I prepared requirements and criteria for complex, high value student research projects, evaluated research proposals from all the students in the school and served as an authoritative source of consultation for students. I also founded an Arctic research group and used this position to teach students how to use geophysical equipment in the field. This included a bi-annual trip to Barrow, Alaska where high school students were full members of a research team that traveled to the arctic and attempted to determine sea ice thickness using various pieces of geophysical equipment. This included thermography (IR surface temperature measurements), resistivity arrays, ground penetrating radar (GPR), and physical ice drilling. I was the senior project manager of the new analytical technique developed using thermography. I designed the instrument, based on the Arduino platform, and protocols for data collection. I also lead the direct analysis and interpretation of data to study the physics of the polar ice sheets. This opportunity allowed me to teach arctic research while also innovating new methods to improve our understanding sea ice plays in our climate system.

The basic requirements as the physics instructor made me responsible for teaching both calculus and algebra based physics (mechanics and electricity & magnetism), and general astronomy (planetary and galactic). Each of these courses were taught at a college level and students received college credit through either New River Community College (NRCC) or Radford University (RU). I created all lecture materials, course calendars, syllabi, laboratory exercises, homework assignments, assessment materials (tests, quizzes, midterm exams, and final exams), and scheduled parent-teacher conferences for at risk students.

Courses independently designed, taught, and evaluated: Algebra Physics (NRCC, PHY201/202), Calculus Physics (NRCC, PHY231/232), Intermediate Astronomy (RU PHYS151/152), Junior/Senior research (approximately 20+ mentees per year) (NRCC SCT198/298), Arctic Geophysics (RU, phys431)

I also worked to develop multiple 30 minute hands-on outreach activities to engage students grades 3-8, custom designed printed circuit board for soldering and programming project for 10th grade school visitors, and established a STEAM Arctic research program for students to learn creative approaches to modern field research.

Southwest Virginia Governor’s School, Network Director

Since the Governor’s School is a small organization, it was important to me to take on multiple roles to ensure that the school thrived. My regular tasks included: Managing $30,000 annual IT budget; purchasing, setup, and maintaining servers (Windows, Linux/CentOS LAMP), and 130+ Windows desktops/laptops; programming and maintaining custom Student Information System interface and database; setup and maintaining LAN infrastructure including Meraki networking equipment; operating the turnkey security system, Linux video surveillance system, and VoIP phone system; developing custom Arduino based door monitoring system that interfaced with MySQL, PHP, and jQuery; managing Google Apps for Education and Adobe Creative Cloud for enterprise; teaching lessons on cybersecurity and network maintenance to faculty and students; functioning as multimedia producer, photographing and video recording students to highlight educational excellence.

I also worked on many additional projects to enhance the school’s ability to teach students. The primary project was the development of the school’s Student Information System (SIS) and gradebook software. It integrated multiple data sets through a web PHP interface using a MySQL relational databases. This complex system was conceived, designed, and upgraded over the years by me after conducting meetings to assess data requirements. Working on the SIS required me to set my own schedule, manage software and hardware, and communicate with the end users to ensure that the system was user-friendly and the information they needed was accessible, functional, and reliable. This experience gives me the ability to capture, assemble, analyze, interpret, manage, and disseminate data to the appropriate users.

Radford University, Adjunct Professor

As an adjunct professor of physics, I was responsible for teaching introductory algebra based physics (PHYS111/PHYS112) for the university. I taught one section with 24 students per semester. Midterm exams were group written with all professors contributing. As such, each semester I was primary author on one midterm exam and responsible for my section’s final examination. In addition, I was responsible for weekly lectures and laboratory instruction. During laboratory exercises, an undergraduate teaching assistant (TA) was assigned to me to help facilitate instruction, and to give the TA experience teaching. I also taught lessons to an Arctic Geophysics class (phys431), created and wrote an Intermediate Astronomy and an Embedded Microcontrollers courses for the RU master catalog, and worked to redesign course material including labs, tests, and testing methodology for the Algebra Physics course.

University of Missouri-St. Louis, Teaching Assistant/Research Assistant

As a research assistant, I worked with data collection and processing for astronomical data. This included processing data from the W.M. Keck II NIRSPEC instrument, collecting and processing data using the NASA IRTF telescope, and processing Spitzer Space Telescope archive data. All data were processed using IDL and IRAF. Data focused on the Rho Ophiuchus and Taurus star forming regions taken by the W. M. Keck II NIRSPEC instrument. Code written for IDL was modernized and used to search for organic molecules in the disks around T Tauri young stellar objects. The primary focus was to find a correlation between column densities of carbon monoxide and inclination angle of the disk.

In addition, I taught Algebra based mechanics and electricity & magnetism physics laboratory exercises each semester (fall and spring). As a TA, I was fully responsible for teaching and helping students, in a class of approximately 24, grasp the laboratory exercise concepts. These were designed to reinforce lectures on mechanics.

Teaching Experience

Spring 2015, Southwest Virginia Governor’s School (SWVGS)

  • One section of Algebra Physics (NRCC PHY202)
  • Two sections of Calculus Physics (NRCC PHY232)
  • One section of Galactic Astronomy (PHYS152)

Spring 2015, Radford University (RU)

  • One section of Algebra Physics (RU PHYS112)

Fall 2014, Southwest Virginia Governor’s School

  • One section of Algebra Physics (NRCC PHY201),
  • Two sections of Calculus Physics (NRCC PHY231)
  • One section of Planetary Astronomy (RU PHYS151)

Fall 2014, Radford University

  • One section of Algebra Physics (RU PHYS111)

Spring 2014, Created New Course: led development for and wrote course description for Embedded Microcontrollers (PHYS310), added to Radford University undergraduate master catalog

Spring 2014, Southwest Virginia Governor’s School

  • One section of Algebra Physics (NRCC PHY202)
  • Two sections of Calculus Physics (NRCC PHY232)
  • One section of Galactic Astronomy (PHYS152)

Spring 2014, Southwest Virginia Governor’s School

  • One section of Algebra Physics (RU PHYS112)

Fall 2013, Southwest Virginia Governor’s School

  • One section of Algebra Physics (NRCC PHY201)
  • Two sections of Calculus Physics (NRCC PHY231)
  • One section of Planetary Astronomy (RU PHYS151)

Fall 2013, Radford University

  • One section of Algebra Physics (RU PHYS111)

Spring 2013, Southwest Virginia Governor’s School

  • One section of Algebra Physics (NRCC PHY202)
  • Two sections of Calculus Physics (NRCC PHY232)
  • One section of Galactic Astronomy (PHYS231)

Spring 2013,  Radford University

  • Taught one section of Algebra Physics (RU PHYS112)

Spring 2013, Created New Courses: led development for and wrote course description for Intermediate Solar System Astronomy (ASTR151) and Intermediate Galactic Astronomy (ASTR152), added to Radford University undergraduate master catalog

Fall 2012, Southwest Virginia Governor’s School

  • One section of Algebra Physics (NRCC PHY201)
  • Two sections of Calculus Physics (NRCC PHY231)
  • One section of Planetary Astronomy (RU PHYS231)

Fall 2012, Radford University

  • One section of Algebra Physics (RU PHYS111)

Spring 2012, Southwest Virginia Governor’s School

  • One section of Algebra Physics (NRCC PHY202)
  • Two sections of Calculus Physics (NRCC PHY232)
  • One section of Galactic Astronomy (PHYS231)

Spring 2012, Radford University

  • One section of Algebra Physics (RU PHYS112)

Fall 2011, Southwest Virginia Governor’s School

  • One section of Algebra Physics (NRCC PHY201)
  • Two sections of Calculus Physics (NRCC PHY231)
  • One section of Planetary Astronomy (RU PHYS231)
  • One section of Special Topics – Electrical Resistivity Tomography (RU PHYS231)

Fall 2011, Radford University

  • One section of Algebra Physics (RU PHYS111)

August 2011, began teaching at Radford University

  • Taught Introductory Physics. As an Adjunct Professor, I was a member of a team teaching group. All sections (between 4 and 6 per semester) were given the same homework and tests to ensure that all classes covered the same material. Tests were group written with a primary author who took comments and suggestions from other professors and made revisions. As such, each semester I was primary author on one midterm exam and responsible for my section’s final examination.

Spring 2011, Southwest Virginia Governor’s School

  • One section Calculus Physics (NRCC PHY232)
  • Two sections of Algebra Physics (NRCC PHY202)
  • One section of General Astronomy (RU PHYS231)

Fall 2010, Southwest Virginia Governor’s School

  • Two sections of Algebra Physics (NRCC PHY201)
  • One section of Calculus Physics (NRCC PHY231)
  • One section of General Astronomy (RU PHYS231)

Spring 2010, New River Community College (NRCC)

  • One section of General Physics (NRCC PHY130)

Spring 2010, Southwest Virginia Governor’s School

  • Two sections of Algebra Physics (NRCC PHY202)
  • Two sections of Calculus Physics (NRCC PHY232)

Fall 2009, Southwest Virginia Governor’s School

  • Two sections of Algebra Physics (NRCC PHY201)
  • Two sections of Calculus Physics (NRCC PHY231)

July 2009, Began teaching at the Southwest Virginia Governor’s School (SWVGS)

  • Taught Calculus Physics and Algebra Physics. As the physics instructor, I was responsible for creating all lecture materials, course calendar, syllabi, laboratory exercises, homework assignments, assessment materials (tests, quizzes, midterm exams, and final exams), and scheduling parent-teacher conferences for at risk students.

Spring 2009, University of Missouri-St. Louis

  • Teaching Assistant (TA), Algebra based Electricity and Magnetism physics laboratory exercises

Fall 2008, University of Missouri-St. Louis

  • TA, Algebra based Mechanics physics laboratory exercises

Spring 2008, University of Missouri-St. Louis

  • TA, Algebra based Electricity and Magnetism physics laboratory exercises

Fall 2007, University of Missouri-St. Louis

  • TA, Algebra based Mechanics physics laboratory exercises

Spring 2007, University of Missouri-St. Louis

  • TA, Algebra based Electricity and Magnetism physics laboratory exercises

Fall 2006, University of Missouri-St. Louis

  • TA, Algebra based Mechanics physics laboratory exercises

Spring 2006, University of Missouri-St. Louis

  • TA, Algebra based Electricity and Magnetism physics laboratory exercises

Fall 2005, Teaching Assistantship (TA) at the University of Missouri-St. Louis (UMSL).

  • Taught Algebra based Mechanics physics laboratory exercises. As a TA, I was fully responsible for teaching and helping students in a class of approximately 24 grasp the laboratory exercise concepts, these were designed to reinforce lectures on Mechanics

Presentations and Publications

March 2015, Wrote an article on arctic research that was featured on the SparkFun.edu blog

December 14-18, 2014, Fall Meeting of the American Geophysical Union, San Francisco, California. “A possible correlation between surface temperature and thickness of arctic sea ice,” Poster presented, contributors: Dr. Rhett Herman (Radford University (RU) faculty); Corey Roadcap, Melissa Brett, Cameron Baumgardner, Jordan Eagle, and Sarah B. Montgomery (RU students); and Daniel Blake (Southwest Virginia Governor’s School (SWVGS) & RU)

April 2014, Radford University Student Engagement Forum co-mentor

  • “Data Analysis from Ohmy.” Oral Presentation by: Jordan Eagle and Austin Owen
  • “Investigating correlations between resistivity & thermal data on the arctic sea ice.”  Presented by: Sarah Montgomery (RU) and Corey Roadcap (RU)
  • “Data Collection and Analysis with Whistler.” Oral Presentation by: Cameron Baumgardner (RU) and Ashley Jordan (SWVGS)

December 03-07, 2012, Fall Meeting of the American Geophysical Union, San Francisco, California. “Correlation between the surface temperature & thickness of Arctic sea ice.” Poster presented, contributors: Dr. Rhett Herman (RU Faculty); Alec Frazier (RU, SWVGS Alumni) and Andrew Vaccaro (SWVGS); and Dan Blake (SWVGS & RU).

Fall 2012, Chesapeake Section of the American Association of Physics Teachers (CS-AAPT) Fall Meeting, Oral Presentation: “Embedded Electronics, Microcontrollers in the classroom”; won best high school teacher presentation award

April 2012, Radford University Student Engagement Forum co-mentor

  • “Thermal Data Collection on the Surface of Arctic Sea Ice.” Oral Presentation by: Andrew Vaccaro (SWVGS), Megan Lacy (SWVGS), and Madonna Yoder (SWVGS)
  • “Evaluation of Arctic Sea Ice Thickness by Geophysical Analysis.” Oral Presentation by: Marcus (RU) Jessee, and Alec Frazier (RU, SWVGS Alumni)

October 15, 2011, Radford University Homecoming celebration Public Talk: “Radford University’s Polar Research Program” with Dr. Rhett Herman (RU)

March 14, 2011, Public Talk: “Radford University’s Polar Research Program,” sponsored by the RU Museum of the Earth Sciences, with Dr. Rhett Herman (RU)

December 13-17, 2010, Fall Meeting of the American Geophysical Union, San Francisco, California. “A study of the surface temperature and thickness of the arctic sea ice and time evolution of the ice/water boundary.” Poster presented, contributors: Dr. Rhett Herman (RU), Biyuan Zhao (SWVGS), and Dan Blake (SWVGS & RU).

August 2008, NOAO Grant Proposal ID #2008B-0030 “Further Observations of Dust/Gas Stratification in the Disks of Young Stellar Objects

June 01-05, 2008, 212th annual American Astronomical Society (AAS) Conference, St. Louis, Missouri. “Organic Molecules in Protoplanetary DisksPoster Presented, contributors: Horne, D., Blake, D., and Gibb, E. (University of Missouri-St. Louis); Rettig, T. (University of Notre Dame); and Brittain, S. (Clemson University). Also printed in the Bulletin of the American Astronomical Society, Vol. 40, p.201.

July 2007, Masters Thesis, University of Missouri-St. Louis, successfully defended. “Carbon Monoxide in Disks Around Young Stellar Objects”

  • Abstract: I present preliminary high-resolution, near-infrared NIRSPEC spectra of ro-vibrational carbon monoxide (CO) absorptions found in disks around three Class II T Tauri stars: DG Tau B, AA Tau and Haro 6-5 B. 12CO column densities were measured via overtone and fundamental lines in the 2 and 5 µm regions, respectively. 13CO absorptions were observed for DG Tau B and upper limits were calculated for Haro 6-5 B. Rotational temperatures and column densities are presented for each source along with a comparison of NCO/AV to inclination angle for DG Tau B and Haro 6-5 B. Data for these sources were compared to results presented by Rettig et al. (2006) to test a model of disk stratification. Initial results for Haro 6-5 B are consistent with the data reported by Rettig et al. (2006). Values for DG Tau B were inconclusive due to discrepancies between M-Wide and K band data for both rotational temperatures and column densities. However, values for DG Tau B were only off by a factor of ~2-3 when compared to Rettig et al. (2006). NCO/AV values for AA Tau did not fit the trends presented by Rettig et al. (2006). However the source showed strong band head absorptions at K-band which indicate high temperatures and contamination of spectral lines by photospheric absorption.

 

Spring 2003, Radford University Faculty Lecture Series presenter

Research

March 2014, Co-led Arctic research in Barrow, Alaska. Sponsored two Governor’s School students to be full members of the Radford University Arctic Research team. Independently funded, designed, and developed a second generation thermal sensor suit that more accurately collected data. The setup was built from the ground up based on the previous trips’ sensor suit. Revisions were completed based on analysis of instrument performance in the field and research team member comments on how it could be improved. Hardware used included an Arduino Pro-mini, Melexis MLS90614, TMP36, and SparkFun OpenLog. This specialized equipment worked in concert with the Geometrics OhmMapper to show a tentative correlation between sea ice thickness and surface temperature

March 2012, Co-led Arctic research in Barrow, Alaska. Sponsored three Governor’s School students to be full members of the Radford University Arctic Research team. Independently funded, designed, and developed a custom printed circuit board to connect an Arduino Pro-mini to a Melexis MLX90614 IR temperature sensor, GPS, ambient temperature sensor, and SparkFun OpenLog to collect data. Students worked to refine data collection for thermal data.

March 2010, Co-led Arctic research in Barrow, Alaska. Sponsored three Governor’s School students to be full members of the Radford University Arctic Research team and learned to properly lay our survey lines and use industry grade research equipment. This included the use of the Geometrics OhmMapper, Trimble GPS, and Maxim Integrated Thermochrons. SWVGS students were responsible for brainstorming the idea to collect surface temperature data to try to determine a correlation with ice thickness.  This required them to design the survey and experimental procedure for using the Thermochrons.

2006-2009, Graduate Research, University of Missouri-St. Louis (UMSL). Data focused on the Rho Ophiuchus and Taurus star forming regions taken by the W. M. Keck II NIRSPEC instrument were processed. Used programs designed in IDL to search for organic molecules in the disks around T Tauri young stellar objects. The primary focus was to find a correlation between column densities of carbon monoxide and inclination angle of the disk. Completed major updates on the IDL code, and collaborated to update the atmospheric calibration model.

2006-2008, Graduate Research, Hale Pohaku, Hawaii. Data were collected on multiple trips to Hawaii using the NASA Infrared Telescope Facility (IRTF) on the summit of Mauna Kea. The CSHELL instrument was used in concert with the telescope to look at young stellar objects in the Rho Ophiuchus and Taurus star-forming regions. Prior to the trips, programs of study were created along with detector and calibration settings.  Grant money was provided by the National Science Foundation (NSF) for this trip and for the telescope time

  • 2008, one of two members of the research group that went to Hawaii for one week to collect data spending 6 nights of 6 hour shifts on the telescope.
  • 2007, one of two members of the research group that went to Hawaii for one week to collect data spending 6 nights of 6 hour shifts on the telescope.
  • 2006, one of two members of the research group that went to Hawaii for one week to collect data spending 6 nights of 12 hour shifts on the telescope.

Summer 2004, NASA Student Intern Program (SIP) Summer Intern. Research in Optics. Learned clean room protocols (class 10,000 clean room), soldering, spectroscopy, pump laser operation, thermal chamber operation, and visited NASA Kennedy Space Center for a space craft launch (scrubbed)

Summer 2003, NOAA NESDIS Satellite Services Division (SSD) Intern. Worked with operational satellite data to classify hurricanes and learned how to process operational satellite data to watch weather patterns, fires, and ice

Spring 2003, Radford University team member on NASA Arctic trip to the North Pole. Used geophysics equipment to study the thickness of the surface ice. Experimental setup using an EM-31 to measure conductivity of the seawater to try and correlate thickness to conductivity. Multiple outreach webcasts were done to connect with students across the United States and inform them about how climate change affects the arctic. In addition, an APT antenna was built to collect WEFAX satellite images from NOAA POES satellites

Summer 2002, Radford University trip to NASA Wallops Flight Facility to learn satellite operations and maintenance

Summer 2002, NASA Special Projects Initiative (SPI) Office Intern, worked with multimedia producer to create a feature video of the EO1 spacecraft

Summer 2001, NASA SPI Office Intern. Worked on educational content. The office also visited Wallops Flight Facility to tour the facility and learn how NASA and NOAA operate and maintain spacecraft for environmental surveys

Fall/Spring 2000-2001, NASA Goddard SPI Office Intern. After completing a half day at Northwest High School, worked the remainder of the day at NASA Goddard in the SPI Office. As part of the SPI Office, conducted outreach trips and sent educational content back to United States high schools around the country. At each location, photos and videos were collected along with live broadcasts with streaming video from remote locations. Locations included:

  • NASA Kennedy Space Center for a shuttle launch (scrubbed)
  • Hoover Dam to look at hydroelectric power generation
  • Grand Canyon to study geology
  • Colorado for a dinosaur dig to understand stratification and petrification
  • Death Valley to understand extreme climates and geology

Summer 2000, NASA Goddard SPI Office geologic survey of Mt. St. Helens

Summer 2000, NASA Goddard SPI Office intern

May 2000, NASA Goddard Special Projects Initiatives (SPI) Office geologic survey on the Big Island of Hawaii. Performed geologic studies of the shield volcanoes. A series of webcasts were done to educate the general public on volcanoes and how they function

Network Administration/Computer Technology

Summer 2015, Southwest Virginia Governor’s School (SWVGS): Network upgrades

  • built new custom CentOS LAMP server to replace faulty server hardware; became the primary Student Information System (SIS) server
  • replaced hardware in old SIS server and reconfigured as backup SIS server running an identically set up CentOS LAMP operating system
  • wrote Bash scripts to allow simple switch-over from primary server to backup server in case of unrecoverable crash
  • reconfigured the location of network printers to reduce overhead costs
  • researched and purchased computers to replace one third of the school’s computers (approximately 35)
  • set up licensing for Adobe Creative Cloud Enterprise
  • taught lessons on Linux to school faculty

Summer 2014, SWVGS: Network upgrades

  • switched from Cisco 1841 to Meraki MX80 for security, content filtering, and wireless access
  • replaced the server hosting the Student Information System with a new custom-built CentOS LAMP server
  • modified the Student Information System to handle nine week grading periods instead of six week grading periods
  • set up automated backup and replication of Student Information System data between two servers allowing for nearly seamless transition from primary to backup server in case of a system crash
  • researched, purchased, and replaced one third of the school’s computers (approximately 35)
  • researched options to replace high volume copy machine, signed a new contract
  • started using Adobe Creative Cloud Complete to produce high quality multimedia products
  • researched and purchased audio and video equipment for recruitment and retention videos

Summer 2013, SWVGS: Network upgrades

  • switched the school from Exchange 2007 to Google Apps for Education, allowing all the students to have their own email addresses tied to the school
  • developed the 5th generation of the Student Information System (SIS), which is served through a custom PHP website that accesses MySQL relational databases to provide all relevant information about students. This includes addresses, parents names, phone numbers, attendance records, grade records, generation of report cards, and academic warnings. It also includes automated scripts to send messages to administrators about at-risk students.  The 5th generation of SIS included many security upgrades to help ensure that only the approved users were able to access student information. All data was sent via SSL/TLS to prevent packet sniffing, and was stored on a secure server on site along with an offsite encrypted backup.
  • finished testing of custom designed and developed gradebook software based on PHP that functions by accessing MySQL relational databases and was implemented school wide for teachers to use
  • researched, purchased, and replaced one third of the school’s computers (approximately 35)
  • upgraded all school computers from Office 2010 to Office 2013 using Group Policy (GPO) and configuring the Key Management Server (KMS)
  • moved the school website from internal to external hosting along with redesigning it from scratch with no external code (this was run off PHP/MySQL including an interface for the director of the school to edit the fully dynamic pages with no understanding of HTML)
  • purchased a plotter for the school to enable students to print posters for their science fair projects and informational posters for the building

Summer 2013, SWVGS: Security System

  • Researched and found a vendor to install a professional building security system
    • IR outdoor camera
    • RIFD entry
    • door timer system
    • intercom door unlocking via VoIP phones – allowing the door to be unlocked remotely
  • upgraded camera system and an increased number of security cameras (increased from 9 to 15 cameras), all still controlled by ZoneMinder
  • developed a custom door position monitoring system using Arduino Ethernet’s with PoE, reed switches, a MySQL database and PHP/jQuerry website that automatically updated as doors in the building were opened and closed to allow administrators to know if the individual class rooms are secured in case of an emergency

Summer 2012, SWVGS: Network upgrades

  • researched, purchased, and replaced one third of the school’s computers (approximately 35)
  • researched and purchased Vernier Labquest 2 data loggers along with new sensors for all classes
  • increased the number of security cameras from seven to nine in the building
  • purchased a new custom-built Linux CentOS LAMP server to handle the increased amount of Student Information System data
  • custom redesigned entire www.swvgs.us website, including editable database for non-technical editors to use
  • switched from HP Procurve access points (AP) to Meraki MR16’s AP’s to handle network traffic
  • developed the 4th generation of the Student Information System using PHP and MySQL relational databases to allow for better optimization and more security features. This system was based on a relational database running on MySQL and a series of SQL queries created to link 45+ tables to produce quality reports
  • started development of gradebook website that used PHP to access MySQL relational databases for faculty to use. This enhanced the suite of tools already availble to teachers via SIS. It also allowed administrators to see student grades directly and presented students and parents with uniform grade printouts across all courses.

Summer 2011, SWVGS: Network upgrades

  • increased the number of security cameras from three to seven in the building
  • researched, purchased, and replaced one third of the school’s computers (approximately 35)
  • replaced non-functional printers and projectors
  • updated phone system to VoIP and switched from T1 connection to a cable modem for internet, quadrupling the data speed and cutting the cost per month by a factor of ten
  • added HP Procurve AP’s and an HP Procurve Mobility controller to allow devices to hand off from one AP to another which allows data to continue to stream to the device without interruption
  • developed the 2nd and 3rd generation of the Student information System (SIS) which was put into official use for the 2011-2012 school year. This integrated multiple data sets through a web PHP interface using a MySQL relational database. This complex system was conceived, designed, and upgraded over the years by me after conducting meetings to assess data requirements. Working on the SIS required me to set my own schedule, manage software and hardware, and communicate with the end users to ensure that the information they needed was accessible, user-friendly, functional, and reliable. SIS reduced teacher and administrative overhead and allowed all faculty members to spend more time on educating and less on administration.

Summer 2010, SWVGS: Network upgrades

  • researched, purchased, and replaced one third of the school’s computers (approximately 35)
  • started working with security cameras to increase student safety in the building (this included setting up a Linux server to host three IP cameras that were installed and configured to work with a custom ZoneMinder install)
  • upgraded school’s Wi-Fi with HP Procurve MSM410 AP’s
  • replaced printers and other outdated equipment
  • began programming original Student Information System using PHP and MySQL relational databases
  • implemented security standards requiring faculty and teachers to encrypt all student information

December 2009, Promoted to Network Director and began overseeing all aspects of computer and technology infrastructure for the building

  • setup Cisco 1841 integrated services router
  • reinstalled operating systems on the primary and backup Windows Server 2008 servers
  • re-deployed all computers to better suit student needs (approximately 140 computers)
  • imaged all school computers using Windows PE environment

Educational Mentoring Experience

January 2015, Sponsored science fair projects of 21 students. Below is a list of project titles:

  • The Correlation Between Surface Temperature and Arctic Sea Ice Thickness (team project)
    • Grand award winner, including a trip to the International Science Fair in Pittsburgh, PA
  • Spoon For Young Children and Those With Parkinson’s Disease
  • Laminitis Correction Boot
  • How Lead Off Stances Affect Speed in Softball
  • Underwater Eco-Friendly Turbine
  • UAVs in Search and Rescue
  • Animal Hair Removal from Clothing in the Dryer
  • Model of Plastic Filtering Boat
  • Improved Running Shoe Technology
  • Does Weight Affect Height?
  • Eye Tracking for Robot Movement
  • Infant Passenger Alert System
  • Effect of the Amount of Fins on a Rocket’s Altitude
  • The Road to Clean Energy
  • Blood Sugar Monitoring and Medication Dispensing Robot
  • Teflon Mechanics
  • Autonomous Vehicle Navigation: Rapid Environmental Mapping
  • Sparks Are Flying: Parallel Fault Detection
  • Effects of a Bat’s Weight in Baseball
  • The Effect of Arm Placement on a Grand Jeté

January 2014, Sponsored science fair projects of 29 students. Below is a list of project titles:

  • A Helpful Hand-Wash Reminder
  • A More Reliable and Less Expensive Paper Towel Dispenser
  • Exercising Energy
  • Wheel Weights
  • Reducing Wind Resistance and Drag to Boost Electric Car Efficiency
  • Development of Directory-Specific Software for the Extraction of CxxTest Modules
  • Charge from Your Heat
  • Design and Construction of an Arctic Ice Temperature Measuring Device
  • Using a Static Cling Solar Panel as an Efficient Alternate Way of Charging Small Mobile Devices
  • Modifications to Solar Oven Design for Developing Countries
  • First or Second Base? Efficiency of Throw Downs in Softball
  • The Effect of Shoe Treads in Cheerleading
  • Creating an Ultrasound Probe
  • The Slider Seat
  • Wireless Energy Phone Charger
  • Charging via Breath
  • A Deterrent for Burglary
  • Electromagnetic Radiation Shield
  • The Triboelectric Effect Used in Footwear
  • Flight Analysis of Spin-Guided vs. Non Spin-Guided Rockets
  • Solar Charging a Battery
  • Pitcher’s Head Protection
  • Effects of High Protein Breakfasts on Daily Ability
  • Keep Calm and Spin On
  • Holding a Cup; The Right Way
  • Physics Affects Everything: The Perfect Time to Take Off and Spike a Ball
  • Electronic Boiler-Water Level Detector for an Outdoor Furnace
  • Tethering a Quadcopter
  • Self-Sorting Beverage Container Recycling Bin

January 2013, Sponsored science fair projects of 24 students. Below is a list of project titles:

  • Fan Powered by a Stationary Exercise Bike
  • Soccer Shin Guard Impact Testing
  • Foot-Pedal Toilet Seat Lifter
  • Portable Toaster
  • Correlation Between Arctic Sea Ice Surface Temperature and Thickness
  • Establishing a Baseline Seismic Velocity for a Limestone Quarry
  • Sound to Electricity
  • Leading With Your Face or Your Feet
  • Increasing the Efficiency of Hydroelectric Generators
  • Effects of Magnetism on the Optical Density of a Thin Film
  • The Impact of a Fan Against Convective Heat Transfer at Various Heights
  • Freshwater – As Simple as Effervescence
  • The Effects of Composition on Guitar String Tuning Capabilities
  • Exploring Alternative Methods of Recording 3D Video
  • Magnetic Frost Blanket
  • Rapid Eye Movement (REM) Sleep Clock
  • The Aerodynamics of a Semi-Truck
  • The Effects of Force on Acceleration
  • Sheet Music Page Turning Device
  • Tow Dolly
  • Analyzing Samples with the STM/AFM
  • Optimal Sailboat Sails
  • Evaluation and Comparison of Various Wind Turbine Modifications: The Effect of Low Pressure and Turbulence on the Efficiency of a Wind Turbine for Increased Generation of Power

January 2012, Sponsored science fair projects of 17 students. Below is a list of project titles:

  • Computer Program for Studying Quiz Bowl
  • Raisable Sidewalk Covering
  • Laser Alarm Clock
  • Creating a Variable Speed Scrolling Sheet Music Assistant
  • Wind Power for Home Use
  • Kinesthetic Awareness and You
  • Guitar Strings and Their Tuning Capabilities
  • Elasticity of Tennis Balls at Different Temperatures
  • Measuring the Seismic Velocity of Quarry Blasting
  • Pulse Width Modulations vs. Direct Current in LED’s
  • Weight vs. Force in Bowling
  • The Effects of Bat Speed and Contact on the Distance Softballs Travel
  • Transfer of Electricity through Spark Plug Wires Relative to Price
  • Shedding Light: A Study of the OIII to Visual Flux Ratio of Astronomical Objects
  • Asteroid 2005 YU55: An Analysis
  • Automated Resistivity Survey
  • Application of Capacitive Coupling for Surveying

January 2011, Sponsored science fair projects of 18 students. Below is a list of project titles:

  • The Music of the Heart: The Transformation of Electrocardiogram (ECG) into Sound.
    • Grand award winner, including a trip to the International Science Fair in Los Angeles, CA
  • Airsoft BBs: The Price of Velocity
  • Kill-O-Watt Killers
  • Does the Temperature of Paintballs Affect Accuracy?
  • Chronological Crystal Orientation of Formation of Ice Structures
  • Jupiter!
  • How Do Cordless Phones Affect Wireless Router Signals
  • Soloist Amplification Uniform
  • The Physics of Leaps
  • Friction and Skateboarding
  • Cold Dark Nebulae
  • Cheap Wind: Energy from Wind for Free
  • Arctic Research Sensor Array
  • Planetary Nebula
  • Path Plotting: Underwater Glider Path Quantification
  • Infrared LED Lighting
  • Effects of Temperature on Solar Panel Output
  • The Origin of Circular Flow in Whitewater Hydraulics

January 2010, Sponsored science fair projects for 28 students. Below is a list of project titles:

  • Hydrofoil Development for Autonomous Underwater Vehicles
    • Grand award winner
  • How Do Microwaves Affect Wireless Router Signals?
  • Thermal Insulation
  • Accuracy by Price of Airsoft BB’s
  • Comparison of Wing Sails versus Conventional Sails
  • Eco-Rider
  • Breakfast Buddy
  • Fracturing Fishing Line
  • Accessible Shelving for the Disabled
  • Self-Supporting Locker Shelf
  • Coilgun Analysis
  • Solar Energy: Focused on the Future
  • Staying Alive CPR: The Effect of Music on Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation
  • Differences of Impact Force on a Skateboard
  • Sea Ice
  • Photometry of Stars
  • Muzzle Blast
  • Acoustical Analysis of the Giles High School Auditorium
  • The Effects of Angular Perception on the Distance a Football is Thrown
  • Mass and Speed in Gymnastic Vaulting
  • What Affects Gyroscopic Drift?
  • May the Clogging Force Be with You
  • Does the Brand of Shotgun Shell Affect its Precision?
  • Does the Shot Size in Shotgun Shells Affect the Precision of the Spread?
  • Elasticity of Rubber Bands
  • Will the Brand of Ammunition Affect its Precision?
  • Arrow Force
  • Behind the Lens

Awards, Honors, and Scholarly Associations

2012, Joined Chesapeake Section of the American Association of Physics Teachers (CS-AAPT)

2011, acquired SCUBA certification

2010, Joined American Geophysical Society (AGU)

Photo published in the Bellerive, UMSL student magazine: “Keck Fires its Laser” A long exposure photograph taken on the summit of Mauna Kea on a research trip

2006, Photo displayed in UMSL Student Center Art in gallery: “Frozen Eyes” A picture taken at the North Pole of a researcher who had icicles growing from his eyelashes

Spring 2005, acquired motorcycles license

2004, Founding member of the Radford University chapter of the Society of Physics Students (SPS)

2004-2005, Student Government Association (SGA) Parliamentarian

Spring 2004, Radford University recruitment profile video: https://vimeo.com/135271898

Fall 2004, Phi Sigma Pi Parliamentarian

Fall 2004, Radford University. Featured in cover story: “Of Ice and Men”

2003-2004, SGA At Large Senator

2003-2004, Phi Sigma Pi Rush Chair

February 2004, Purchased and began maintenance of first website, www.the-frozen-tundra.com

Spring 2002, Joined Phi Sigma Pi, National Honors Fraternity